Insurance Policy Types

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, institutions of higher education are facing significant revenue challenges and incurring extra expenses for which their insurance programs should provide relief. Potentially covered sources of loss and damage include (1) efforts to make buildings safe for students, faculty, staff, and administrators, (2) tuition adjustments, loss of athletic and extra-curricular events

The insurance industry in the United States continues to thwart legislative solutions for disputed COVID-19-related losses under property/business interruption policies and resists efforts to group lawsuits together into multi-district federal litigation or class actions. Meanwhile, the independent regulator of insurers in the United Kingdom, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), is trying to take a more

In the latest episode of the podcast series Insurance Considerations Amid COVID-19, we are joined by Deborah White, president of the Retail Litigation Center (RLC) and senior executive vice president and general counsel of the Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA). Deborah provides insight and analysis regarding the retail industry’s varied and innovative response to the pandemic, including how large retailers deal with the patchwork of evolving state and local regulations and how they are innovating at breakneck speed to meet consumer demand while maintaining safety for employees, suppliers, and customers. Not surprisingly, we also talk about masks, how we all got our start in retail, and a little … insurance.

Continue Reading Podcast Series: Key Insurance Considerations Amid COVID-19

General liability coverage is insurance that responds to sums that the policyholder is legally obligated to pay as damages because of bodily injury or property damage to third parties (and generally will also include either a duty to defend such claims or to reimburse defense costs). Thus, general liability coverage would respond to such tort claims as slip-and-fall lawsuits and product liability exposures. In addition, most such policies also cover certain enumerated personal or advertising injury offenses (such as defamation or disparagement).

Most general liability policies are written on an “occurrence” basis. An occurrence-based general liability policy is triggered to respond by bodily injury or property damage taking place during its policy period, regardless of when the claim is made against a policyholder. Given multi-year statutes of limitations for many torts and the possibility of latent injuries, this means that it is frequently a prior year’s occurrence policy (or policies, for long-term injury claims) that responds to a claim that comes in during the current year.


Continue Reading Key Issues to Consider When Contemplating a Switch From an Occurrence-Based to a Claims-Made General Liability Insurance Program

As the COVID-19 pandemic spreads across the globe, countries have by and large placed limitations on how certain businesses can operate and have required other businesses to temporarily cease operations altogether. Businesses impacted by these restrictions have suffered substantial financial losses and, unsurprisingly, are looking to their business interruption insurers to cover these losses. As businesses begin to make business interruption claims, a stark contrast is arising between how U.S. and European insurers and governments are handling the influx of such claims related to COVID-19.

Continue Reading United States vs. Europe: How Insurers Have Responded to Business Interruption Claims Related to COVID-19

What is Business Interruption Coverage?

Business Interruption Coverage is a type of insurance coverage that compensates you for lost revenue when your business is unable to operate for a period as result of some physical property loss or damage caused by a covered peril. The most common example is a fire that damages a business property. If that damage prevents a business from operating as usual, business interruption coverage could provide the revenue your company would have made during the time it was unable to operate because the building was being restored. While a fire could certainly damage a tech company’s property, a tech company might be more vulnerable than other companies to certain types of damage, such as a weather-related event that knocks out the temperature controls in a data center, thereby resulting in the loss of, or damage to, electronic data. While nearly all companies in this day and age store data electronically, a data center can be more of the heart and soul of tech company than other types of companies.
Continue Reading Fundamentals of Business Interruption Coverage—What Tech Startups Might Need to Know

By Nicholas Gellert

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many business locations are shuttered, with work being done, if at all, only remotely. In addition, many businesses or owners of real property may have already filed or are considering filing insurance claims for associated losses from not being able to use their owned or leased premises. The purpose of this piece is to caution owners or tenants to review their property policies closely for vacancy-related conditions or exclusions.


Continue Reading COVID-19 Insurance Alert: Review Insurance Policies for Vacancy-Related Provisions

By Jay Rossiter, Les Brown

There is growing evidence that the insurance industry is taking a concerted, joint approach to denying business interruption claims that relate in any way to COVID-19. Even if a business purchased insurance to protect against business interruption, civil authority orders, and other related events, insurance companies are discouraging and/or denying such claims without even reviewing the specific facts or insurance policy language that might be at issue. Unfortunately, insurance brokers and agents—on whom many businesses rely to give them advice in the first instance—are also discouraging claims. California Insurance Commissioner Ricardo Lara issued a directive on April 14, 2020 to address this inappropriate and damaging conduct.


Continue Reading California Insurance Commissioner Issues Notice Requiring Heightened Scrutiny for Business Interruption Claims

The general intent of business interruption (BI) insurance is to cover unexpected losses to the business from the inability to use property necessary to run the business. The current form BI policies have a mechanism for making a claim for loss of revenue and/or increased costs to the business. They typically also have Civil Authority coverage to replace lost revenue when the government closes a business’s property, but carriers generally consider this a limited remedy for a short time period (such as a month). The real disagreement from carriers regarding coronavirus (COVID-19) claims is that there must be physical property damage, and even if there is property damage, the virus exclusion prevents claims for losses from COVID-19. Moreover, carriers argue that if these coverage issues are defeated in court or removed by legislation, the carriers do not have sufficient reserves to cover the anticipated BI-related claims caused by COVID-19. For example, the American Property Casualty Insurance Association has recently claimed that being forced by legislative intervention to cover small business BI losses related to COVID-19 would cost insurers $383 billion a month.

Continue Reading Congress or the States Could Use the Existing Mechanism of BI Claims to Provide a Further Bailout to Businesses That Are Hurt by COVID-19